Seamen's House

Jan van der Doe
Berichten: 1110
Lid geworden op: vr 09 jan 2009, 14:19
Locatie: Fergus, ON. Canada

Re: Seamen's House

Bericht door Jan van der Doe » ma 04 jan 2016, 14:19

Crewing on a cruise ship: hard work, pleasant
surroundings
by Tim Kern
Being on a crew on a huge modern cruise ship isn't a "Love Boat" experience.
Being on a crew on a huge modern cruise ship isn’t a “Love Boat” experience. Modern ships are much nicer than
the one we saw on television nearly 40 years ago, but the work is hard, handling everything with a smile and
efficiency, all day, every day.
Clearly in command of the position, Pierre Camillieri, from Malta, ran the “passenger side” of 2015’s flagship, Carnival
Breeze, coordinating 1411 employees of 61 nationalities and nine religions, with all that entails. “I think we [Carnival
Cruise Lines] should run the United Nations,” he said. “Living and working onboard is not easy.” Neither is recruiting
and retaining crews that are together, thousands of miles from home, 24/7, for months at a time, who work closely
together to give the 3000+ customers (none of whom has any previous or future relationship with them) a great time.
(By the end of our interview, I wanted him in charge of the UN. Or the world.)

Employees are tested for English mastery – a common language is essential, and nearly all passengers on Breeze
routes speak English. 98% of the passengers were from North America; in the summer, it drops to 92%. On our own
cruise, in mid-January and with school in session, theship is quiet. Only 59 passengers were 12 years old or younger
(and three of them were in our party).Shipboard work is demanding, and crew earn two months’ shore leave after
six months aboard (for officers, it’s two after four). “After a long time on ship, we want them to have time to relax and
have nothing to dowith the job,” Camillieri said. Carnival flies them home and back, anywhere in the world. Their
most-common activity at home is building oradding to a house. “They can schedule their vacations,” he says, “within
some guidelines; and we have some exceptions, too, for finishing a house or a college degree…”
“We give our crew members the chance to make their dreams come true,” says Camillieri. “We have 15 ports in eight
countries. They get lots ofexposure, not just to the ports of call, but on vacations — many spendtheir time in the US or
Australia. And they see a variety of passengers,as well.”
Crew members are officially scheduled to work 7-10 hours a day, but every crewman I interviewed, in many different
areas of the ship, rarely worked fewer than 10; often 12 hours or more. The offsets include five meals a day (plus a
tea and a buffet); couples can work on the same ship, and may get one of a limited number of couples’ cabins. Crew
are bunked two to a room, by sex, nationality, and department; roommate requests are honored.
It’s not surprising that the average age of Camilieri’s crew is 25 (officers average 36), with members ranging from 19
to 65; the oldestare in the engine room, where years of experience are worth big bucks, as the V-6 diesels must run
day and night, flawlessly.
The ship has a Crew Activity Committee; the crews plan the meals within wide guidelines (and one of the hot tips is to
find out whichnationality predominates on a given ship, and make sure you order that nationality’s specialty at dinner
time!).
Though the pay is terrible by U.S. standards (and American workers don’t adjust well to the pace), it’s is good on a
worldwide basis; openings are readily filled, with preference to those with on-board references. And tips – “merit pay”
– can exceed salaries.A Balinese, on his first tour with Carnival, answered my question about the apparent segregation
of American workers. “Americans work in other parts of the ship, because of the way they are paid. They are paid
differently. They get overtime. We all have ten-hour shifts, but if an American works overtime, he gets paid overtime.
Not the rest of us. We work overtime all the time, and don’t ever get paid overtime. That’s why you never see
Americans on [food service] jobs. Indonesians, Indians, South Americans, Philippinos, eastern Europeans, other
Europeanssometimes; Russians – but Americans are always in the other jobs.”
We talked with many crew members, and heard first hand how much they loved the work. And how hard it is. A 31-
year-old man makes $47 base a month; he lives on tips. “I signed up for 10 hours a day, but it’s always more. If I
were still on Bali, I would be working in a hotel orfood service.” Without tourism, “There is nothing to do for a job”
there.“I like working here. It’s good money. I would like to go to school, but I am home only two months at a time, so
I cannot take a course. I could take courses on line, but on the ship there is no time.”
The “no time” mantra was repeated among nearly all the crew I interviewed. My dinner waiter told me about a typical
day at sea: he finished serving about 11p.m., and then had his own dinner. In his bunkat 1a.m., and up at 6. I saw
him at breakfast about 7:30. After breakfast, he grabbed another two hours of sleep; then lunch; then another nap. “I
don’t mind; it’s plenty of sleep. But it took a while to get into the routine. And when we are ashore, or especially when
the ship is in port, everything is different.” Camillieri confirmed that, and added that returning workers “take about
ten days to get back into the shipboard routine.”
Crew cabins are three by four meters, for 2 people, with a private bath– the same size as many passenger cabins;
there is one desk/table. Wi-fi is available to crew at cost. “Nothing is free except our food and ourroom. A uniform is
$200-300, depending on which one.” They buy their own uniforms, which always appeared spotless.
The hardest part of the food-service job, we were told by management and staff alike, was lifting, balancing, and
carrying the maximum-allowed 12 plates. “We train them on the lift,” he said. “We need our crew! ”Rocque, or
“Rocky,” from Bombay (he didn’t call it “Mumbai”) has been a Carnival bartender for 29 years. “I like people,” he says.
“And I meetthe most interesting people, from all over the world. After this muchtime on ships, I am completely used to
the schedule. It is hard, for newpeople [employees] sometimes, but not for me.”Another crewman said, “If a worker
wants to go ashore on his own free time, it comes from allotted sleep time. Really, all other hours are for work –
officially or unofficially, it’s all the same: you’re sleeping or you’re working. Contracts are for 10 hours/day; you work
much more.”Crew are rarely off-station. There is clinic and doctor on board, but, “If you’re sick, you go to the ship’s
medic who says you’re OK and sends you back to work.But! It was apparent to me that the longer they work for
Carnival or in the industry, the happier they are with their jobs. Regardless, everyone– everyone, old and new, even
those quoted above – puts on a happy and helpful face.A young Indonesian crewman said he has worked for Carnival
for five years; he was two months into this tour. “If I were back on Java, I would work in a hotel and make $200-300
Hartelijke Groet/Kind regards.

Jan van der Doe.

Varen is noodzakelijk, leven niet.

Jan van der Doe
Berichten: 1110
Lid geworden op: vr 09 jan 2009, 14:19
Locatie: Fergus, ON. Canada

Re: Seamen's House

Bericht door Jan van der Doe » za 09 jan 2016, 14:55

Afbeelding

from: Maasmond Maritime - Shipping News Clippings
Hartelijke Groet/Kind regards.

Jan van der Doe.

Varen is noodzakelijk, leven niet.

Jan van der Doe
Berichten: 1110
Lid geworden op: vr 09 jan 2009, 14:19
Locatie: Fergus, ON. Canada

Re: Seamen's House

Bericht door Jan van der Doe » ma 11 jan 2016, 14:21

Afbeelding

uit: Maasmond Maritime - Shipping News Clippings.
Hartelijke Groet/Kind regards.

Jan van der Doe.

Varen is noodzakelijk, leven niet.

Jan van der Doe
Berichten: 1110
Lid geworden op: vr 09 jan 2009, 14:19
Locatie: Fergus, ON. Canada

Re: Seamen's House

Bericht door Jan van der Doe » za 16 jan 2016, 01:21

Seafarers’ mission “horrified” at anti-piracy convictions

The international Anglican mission agency which supports seafarers through missions in 260 ports around the world, has spoken out against the conviction of 35 crewmen of the anti-piracy ship MV Seaman Guard Ohio (SGO) by a court in India. The 10 crew and 25 guards have been sentenced to five years in an Indian prison for carrying illegal arms; but the Mission to Seafarers say that the crew were entitled to do so under international law.

“I am horrified and filled with anguish at this decision which is deeply unfair and unjust,” Mission to Seafarers’ director of justice and public affairs, Ken Peters, said. “These men are seafarers but it seems the court did not accept the basic fact that the ship was and is an anti-piracy vessel.

“The men carried arms in accordance with international maritime law for the purpose of ensuring the merchant fleet was protected properly from the very real risk of pirate attacks and hijack. The men have already suffered so much so this is a terrible outcome. It is beyond belief.”

Mission to Seafarers (MtS) has been supporting some of the crew and their families and say that “The men and families are deeply shocked and devastated at this decision and are stunned that the evidence has not irrefutably proven that the men were acting legally under international maritime law.

“The SGO is an anti-piracy support ship that carries crew and guards to protect merchant shipping.”

Mr Peters added that “We understand that the men's defence team are examining the possibility of an appeal.”

The crew were convicted of carrying illegal arms, illegal refuelling and unlawfully entering Indian waters off the coast of Tuticorin on 18 October 2013. They have been held in India ever since and have vehemently protested their innocence.

Bron: ACNS / Anglican News
Hartelijke Groet/Kind regards.

Jan van der Doe.

Varen is noodzakelijk, leven niet.

Jan van der Doe
Berichten: 1110
Lid geworden op: vr 09 jan 2009, 14:19
Locatie: Fergus, ON. Canada

Re: Seamen's House

Bericht door Jan van der Doe » wo 27 jan 2016, 01:34

New Guidance Tackles Shipboard Bullying
January 26, 2016 by gCaptain

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) have teamed up and developed new guidance to prevent bullying and harassment on-board ships.

The Guidance on Eliminating Shipboard Harassment and Bullying provides advice to shipping companies, seafarers and seafarers’ organizations on policies, complaints and grievance procedures to combat bullying and harassment.

These guidelines have been launched prior to International Labor Organization (ILO) Special Tripartite Committee on the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC) to be held in February in Geneva.

The new rules address the responsibilities of seafarers and their employers to use these procedures appropriately and for being aware of any harassment or bullying that might occur within the maritime workplace. This includes any instances of cyber-bullying.

“Ship-owners fully accept the need to develop policies and plans to eliminate any harassment and bullying as a matter of good employment practice. Bullying has serious consequences for the physical and emotional health of seafarers and can also compromise teamwork with negative consequences for the safety of the ship and its crew. The fact that ICS and ITF have collaborated to produce this new Guidance is therefore a very positive development,” ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe stated.

Writing by Nadeem (c) gCaptain
Hartelijke Groet/Kind regards.

Jan van der Doe.

Varen is noodzakelijk, leven niet.

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